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How will COVID-19 Affect Return to High School Sports and ECG Screening?

August is traditionally very busy month in the pediatric cardiology office; visits for “sports clearance” flood the schedule due to something picked up on a high school sports physical such as chest pain. Most of these will be non-cardiac and receive reassurance; however, the cardiac causes in the pediatric population can be quite distressing. With the current COVID-19 pandemic we are seeing many cardiac effects of the virus— myocardial inflammation, dysfunction and coronary artery dilation or MIS-C (multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children). There has also been a reported increase in out of hospital cardiac arrest in the adult population, which could be attributed to those afraid to seek care, but none the less, a concern.

Cardiac effects play an important part in the recent discussions on return to school, as eventually return to school will mean return to school sports. Sports cardiologists have been following this closely and have been working to establish a safe way for return to sports in competitive athletes who have had COVID-191(click here for recommendations and see flowchart below), which may include extensive cardiac testing of those who had symptomatic COVID-19, most of which is based on the return to play myocarditis guidelines.2 These important decisions require individualization, knowledge of risk and what is happening in the community.

So what does this mean for the high school athletes? There is no doubt that exercise is great for everyone, especially with the rising obesity and the sedentary lifestyle. Organized sports participation has shown to have a positive impact on mental and physical health that extends beyond childhood.3 Many have raised concerns about the development and health of children by not attending school, along with decrease in social interaction and activity from organized sports during the stay-at-home orders and while we work to defeat COVID-19 spread.

Prior to the pandemic, the question of universal ECG testing for high school athletes always started a conversation, but could that change? Critics say that the false positives create distress and extra healthcare cost, that follow up is problematic and that it has not been shown to change outcomes. Others argue saving one child from the devastating event of collapsing and dying on the field is worth it, and a recent study showed ECG with H&P is more likely to detect a condition associated with sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) than H&P alone, and also improved cost efficiency when interpreted in the right hands.4 All agree it is important to have a good plan in place for SCA at all sporting events, including an emergency response plan in place specific to cardiac arrest.

With so many affected by the virus, at varying severity, I can’t help but wonder if this will change the way we assess our young athletes for participation in sports when it is safe to do so. While healthcare costs are always a problem, with a new virus and unclear long-term outcomes, we must be conservative. Perhaps this may provide an opportunity to learn more about ECG screening, as we will likely see a larger amount of patients who have had COVID-19 coming to our offices for clearance. This may provide an opportunity to gather evidence on the continued debate of whether ECG screening is effective.

Until we know more, what we do know is it is safer to be conservative, to assess benefit and risk and provide appropriate counseling to families on signs and symptoms of SCA. We also must continue to reassess and stay up-to-date on new knowledge and testing related to COVID-19 recovery and sports. Most importantly, it is important that we continue to advocate for heart safe schools which include having AEDs, training in CPR, and emergency response plans related to Sudden Cardiac Arrest. With more kids participating in school from home, this could be a great opportunity to engage the whole family in CPR and AED education to improve the safety and survival of our communities and at home.

 

References

  1. Phelan, Dermot, et al. “A Game Plan for the Resumption of Sport and Exercise After Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Infection.” JAMA Cardiology, 2020, doi:10.1001/jamacardio.2020.2136.
  2. Maron, Barry J., et al. “Eligibility and Disqualification Recommendations for Competitive Athletes With Cardiovascular Abnormalities: Task  Force 3: Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy, Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy and Other Cardiomyopathies, and Myocarditis.” Journal of the American College of Cardiology, vol. 66, no. 21, 2015, pp. 2362–2371., doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2015.09.035.
  3. Logan, Kelsey, and Steven Cuff. “Organized Sports for Children, Preadolescents, and Adolescents.” Pediatrics, vol. 143, no. 6, 2019, doi:10.1542/peds.2019-0997.
  4. Harmon, Kimberly G, and Jonathan A Drezner. “Comparison of Cardiovascular Screening in College Athletes” Heart Rhythm, 2020, www.heartrhythmjournal.com/article/S1547-5271(20)30406-9/pdf.

“The views, opinions and positions expressed within this blog are those of the author(s) alone and do not represent those of the American Heart Association. The accuracy, completeness and validity of any statements made within this article are not guaranteed. We accept no liability for any errors, omissions or representations. The copyright of this content belongs to the author and any liability with regards to infringement of intellectual property rights remains with them. The Early Career Voice blog is not intended to provide medical advice or treatment. Only your healthcare provider can provide that. The American Heart Association recommends that you consult your healthcare provider regarding your personal health matters. If you think you are having a heart attack, stroke or another emergency, please call 911 immediately.”

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How is the AHA leading the way in Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)?

In writing this last post as a junior blogger, I decided to highlight the tremendous efforts by the American Heart Association (AHA) to improve cardiovascular care in the field of cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). As we know, the AHA is a worldwide leader in first aid, CPR, and Automated External Defibrillator (AED) training – educating millions of people globally in CPR every year. Here, I will share some fun facts about CPR, and you can refer to the AHA website for further details about this important topic.

Important CPR statistics

  • Majority of cardiac arrests occur outside of the hospital, with estimated 475,000 Americans dying from cardiac arrests every year [1]
  • Bystander CPR is a key component in the out-of-hospital “chain of survival” [Figure 1] and studies have shown it improves survival in cardiac arrest [1-3].

Figure 1: The adult out-of-hospital “chain of survival”. Each link of the chain from left to right is numbered 1 through 5: 1- Recognize cardiac arrest and activate the emergency response system, 2- early CPR with high-quality chest compressions, 3- Use AED for rapid defibrillation, 4- basic and advanced emergency services and 5- post-cardiac arrest care and advanced life support [2].

  • Bystander CPR has been increasing over the recent years in both men and women. Despite that, survival improved in men only, but not women [2]. This is important as it highlights that more work is needed to identify additional predictors of survival in women with cardiac arrest.
  • Efforts mandating CPR training in high schools in multiple states [5] and availability of AED in public places, including airports [Figure 2], have helped in increasing the awareness and familiarity of bystander CPR in cardiac arrest [4].

  • Figure 2: A photo of Automated External Defibrillator (AED) in one of the airports.

Personal Experience

From a personal experience, I have visited multiple high schools in my home country as well as in the United States, and have participated as an organizer in the sessions teaching high school students how to perform effective CPR. It is inspiring to see junior students interested in learning and saving lives. The takeaway from my experience is that engagement plays a major role in spreading the word and encouraging the general public to take the extra step and learn how to perform basic and advanced life support techniques.

In conclusion, it is important to remember that the general public are oftentimes our first “link” in the chain of survival; making them an important part of our efforts to improve survival and cardiovascular care in patients with cardiac arrest. A strong chain of survival improves survival and recovery after cardiac arrest. Although there have been improvements in CPR and advanced life support, there remains room for further improvement, and perhaps we can do our part by encouraging our patients, friends and relatives to take the first step and learn how to perform effective CPR and possibly how to use AEDs!!

I have added a few online references for those interested in sharing this with their patients and encouraging them to sign up for both the online and class programs [3,6]!!

References:

  • Meaney PA, Bobrow BJ, Mancini ME, et al. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality: [corrected] improving cardiac resuscitation outcomes both inside and outside the hospital: a consensus statement from the American Heart Association [published correction appears in Circulation. 2013 Aug 20;128(8):e120] [published correction appears in Circulation. 2013 Nov 12;128(20):e408]. Circulation. 2013;128(4):417-435. doi:10.1161/CIR.0b013e31829d8654
  • Malta Hansen C, Kragholm K, Dupre ME, et al. Association of Bystander and First-Responder Efforts and Outcomes According to Sex: Results From the North Carolina HeartRescue Statewide Quality Improvement Initiative. J Am Heart Assoc. 2018;7(18):e009873. doi:10.1161/JAHA.118.009873
  • CPR facts and stats:

https://cpr.heart.org/en/resources/cpr-facts-and-stats

  • Chain of Survival:

https://cpr.heart.org/en/resources/cpr-facts-and-stats/out-of-hospital-chain-of-survival

  • Mandatory CPR training in high school:

https://www.sca-aware.org/schools/school-news/mandatory-cpr-training-in-us-high-schools

  • CPR AED and first aid classes:

https://cpr.heart.org/en/course-catalog-search

“The views, opinions and positions expressed within this blog are those of the author(s) alone and do not represent those of the American Heart Association. The accuracy, completeness and validity of any statements made within this article are not guaranteed. We accept no liability for any errors, omissions or representations. The copyright of this content belongs to the author and any liability with regards to infringement of intellectual property rights remains with them. The Early Career Voice blog is not intended to provide medical advice or treatment. Only your healthcare provider can provide that. The American Heart Association recommends that you consult your healthcare provider regarding your personal health matters. If you think you are having a heart attack, stroke or another emergency, please call 911 immediately.”

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CardioPulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) in the Time of COVID-19

As we continue to see the increasing number of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases and amid the second peak of this pandemic in the United States (US), everyone from physicians to the general public should know how to approach and perform basic life support (BLS) with certain precautions and modifications of routine BLS protocols for patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 status. Importantly, rescuers should always balance the immediate needs of patients with their own safety. Several recently published articles have demonstrated that many patients with COVID-19 can present with cardiac arrest or experience cardiac arrest while hospitalized. In this post, I am going to share a few points on recommended modifications in order to ensure a safe yet effective CPR protocol for our patients.

  • Reduce Provider Exposure to COVID-19

Resuscitations carry added risks to rescuers and healthcare workers for many reasons. CPR involves performing numerous aerosol-generating procedures, including chest compressions, positive-pressure ventilation, and establishment of an advanced airway [1]. It is important to keep in mind that these viral particles can remain suspended in the air with a half-life of around 1 hour per some reports and can be inhaled by those nearby [1]. In addition, resuscitation efforts require numerous providers to work in close proximity to each other and to the patient; thus, the advised social distancing protocols may not be applicable.

Strategies

  • Before entering the scene, all rescuers should don personal protective equipment (PPE) to guard against both airborne and droplet particles.
  • Limit personnel on the scene to only those essential for patient care.
  • In settings with protocols in place and expertise in their use, consider replacing manual chest compressions with mechanical CPR devices to reduce the number of rescuers whenever it is available and in patients who meet the manufacturer’s height and weight criteria.
  • It is important to clearly communicate the COVID-19 status to anyone arriving to the scene and when transferring patients to another setting.

 

  • Prioritize Oxygenation and Ventilation Strategies with Lower Aerosolization Risk
Strategies
  • Attach a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter securely [Figure 1], if available, to any manual or mechanical ventilation device to lower the risk of aerosolization before giving breaths.
  • After healthcare providers assess the rhythm and defibrillate any ventricular arrhythmias, patients in cardiac arrest should be intubated with a cuffed tube at the earliest feasible opportunity. Connect the endotracheal tube to a ventilator with a HEPA filter when available.
  • Minimize the likelihood of failed intubation attempts by doing the following:
    • Assign the provider/approach with the best chance of first-pass success, and
    • Pause chest compressions while intubating with minimal disruption.
  • Video laryngoscopy may reduce exposure to aerosolized particles and should be considered.
  • Once on a closed circuit, minimize disconnections in order to reduce aerosolization.
  • Barriers can be used to minimize spread of the particles during aerosol-generating procedures (Figure 2).

Figure 1: A high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter (arrow) is securely attached to any manual or mechanical ventilation device to lower the risk of aerosolization before giving breaths [2].

Figure 2: Example of barriers potentially used to minimize the spread of the particles during aerosol-generating procedures [2].

  •  Consider the Appropriateness of Starting and Continuing Resuscitation

Like any cardiac arrest, it is important to know when resuscitation efforts are likely to be futile. Although the outcomes for cardiac arrest in COVID-19 are still unknown, the mortality for critically ill patients with COVID-19 is high, especially with increasing age and comorbidities, particularly cardiovascular disease. As such, it is critical to consider all these factors in determining the appropriateness of initial and continued resuscitation efforts, to weigh the likelihood of success against the risk to rescuers.

Strategies
  • Address goals of care with patients, or their proxies, in anticipation of the potential need for increased levels of care.
  • Healthcare systems and Emergency Medical Services (EMS) agencies should institute policies to guide frontline providers in determining the appropriateness of starting and terminating CPR for patients with COVID-19 on the scene, early in the process. The risk stratification and potential policies should be communicated to patients (or proxy) during discussions of goals of care.

In conclusion, there have been modifications to the routine CPR protocols in patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19. With the increasing number of COVID-19 cases, it is very important, for us as physicians and for the general public as well, to review recommended modifications to BLS protocols and apply them where possible, in a step to win the battle against this virus during these unprecedented times!!

References

“The views, opinions and positions expressed within this blog are those of the author(s) alone and do not represent those of the American Heart Association. The accuracy, completeness and validity of any statements made within this article are not guaranteed. We accept no liability for any errors, omissions or representations. The copyright of this content belongs to the author and any liability with regards to infringement of intellectual property rights remains with them. The Early Career Voice blog is not intended to provide medical advice or treatment. Only your healthcare provider can provide that. The American Heart Association recommends that you consult your healthcare provider regarding your personal health matters. If you think you are having a heart attack, stroke or another emergency, please call 911 immediately.”

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Changes to CPR and Response to Cardiac Arrest with COVID-19

When it comes to survival of out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), many advances have been made over the years, 1 early and high-quality chest compressions and defibrillation are key components of this. However, even prior to coronavirus and COVID-19, many bystanders are still hesitant to perform CPR for a variety of reasons; fear of litigation, fear of causing harm, or due to concerns about infectious disease transmission.2 In the new age of social distancing and a highly infectious disease causing stress on our world, the hesitancy may increase. In addition, many programs who have been key in providing education, such as CPR training, have come to a halt during this time.

CPR is generally considered an “aerosolized” procedure, 3 a procedure conveying high risk of transmission of disease via respiratory droplets. Resuscitation efforts in and out of hospital require multiple people in close proximity to each other to respond. In addition, COVID-19 has been reported to cause myocardial injury and ventricular arrhythmia that may predispose someone to cardiac arrest, 1 and despite a pandemic, sudden cardiac arrest and other causes of death do not decline. A concern rising in the medical community since shelter-in-place laws and changing stresses on our medical system, is a notable decrease in visits to the Emergency Departments for common complaints and concerns, such as chest pain, syncope and other things that may dispose someone to a cardiac arrest. We need to be aware of this happening in the community and the potential need for lay and EMS response in these situations.

Lay persons and dispatchers play a key role in survival efforts such as initiating CPR and early defibrillation. There has been documented success with telephone CPR and CPR guidance by dispatchers. An important component of ensuring the best survival of the community and those with COVID-19 or potential COVID-19 is communication and a well-developed community plan to ensure timely and quality resuscitation to patients while protecting rescuers. Recently, Circulation has released Interim Guidance and Advanced life Support in Adults, Children, and Neonates with Suspected or Confirmed COVID-19,1 a quick review is here. Resources from King County EMS in Washington are available for establishing a community response and plan here.

Overall, the common themes are aimed at adequate personal protective equipment (PPE), reducing the number of people responding to an event, and in the case of OHCA for lay people, focusing on hands-only CPR.

For lay persons, the majority of SCA occurs at home. The likelihood of already being exposed to a household contact is high and should be considered when responding to an arrest; for adults hands-only CPR with high-quality compressions is encouraged with early activation of EMS and defibrillation(not an aerosolizing procedure), if available. In the case of pediatric resuscitation, due to the high likelihood of respiratory arrest causing cardiac arrest, it is advised that if willing, after weighing the risk and benefit, that rescue breaths are provided along with compressions. You may use a cloth or mask covering over the victim’s mouth to help reduce transmission in the event it is not a household member.1

For EMS providers, dispatch is crucial in screening calls for any possible risk of exposure to COVID-19, based on symptoms in the victim or any recent contact or household members, and advising whether doing PPE is recommended to the EMS team.1 In Seattle, they have shown a very low rate of transmission to EMS providers when wearing the appropriate PPE.4

For in-hospital cardiac arrest, it is again important to reduce the personnel involved in the resuscitation, close the door when possible, and consider adding PPE to the code carts.  It is also important to use HEPA filters and closed circuit ventilation strategies when it comes to ventilation. The guidance also encourages early intubation by the provider with the highest qualification with the best chance for successful intubation, and use video laryngoscopy when able to minimize aerosolizing the virus while securing a closed circuit airway. The guidance also suggests that if patients are prone and intubated to perform CPR without moving the patient in the standard T7-10 vertebral bodies, however, if they are not intubated to attempt to place them supine and proceed with resuscitation.1

The article also discusses the importance of clarifying goals of care and advanced directives upon arrival, as well as proposes a careful evaluation in the cases of out of hospital cardiac arrest with inability to obtain ROSC, suggesting in some cases, this may be a reason to avoid transport to the hospital due to low likelihood of survival. However, it is important to take into consideration with the benefit, risk and ethics involved.1, 3

Another important update is in regards to maintenance of certification such as BLS/ACLS/PALS. As of March 13, the AHA has offered a 60 day extension for instructor cards and also recommends extension of provider cards for the same length, this allowance is open to be extended based on the evolving threat and CDC/public health recommendations, read the statement here. 5

Many people are looking for things to do in this time of sheltering in place, perhaps this could be an opportunity for education and learning on CPR and AED’s. There are many online resources available, and with the advent of telemedicine, zoom learning and video visits increasing, perhaps we could use this as an opportunity to increase our virtual presence for CPR education.

If you’re interested in some online resources, check out the ILHR website, or your local education center’s website.

  1. Edelson, Dana P, et al. “Interim Guidance for Life Support for COVID-19.” Circulation, ahajournals.org/doi/pdf/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.120.047463.
  2. Scquizzato, Tommaso, et al. “The Other Side of Novel Coronavirus Outbreak: Fear of Performing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.” Resuscitation, vol. 150, 2020, pp. 92–93., doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2020.03.019.
  3. Defilippis, Ersilia M., et al. “Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A View from Trainees on the Frontline.” Circulation, Sept. 2020, doi:10.1161/circulationaha.120.047260.

“The views, opinions and positions expressed within this blog are those of the author(s) alone and do not represent those of the American Heart Association. The accuracy, completeness and validity of any statements made within this article are not guaranteed. We accept no liability for any errors, omissions or representations. The copyright of this content belongs to the author and any liability with regards to infringement of intellectual property rights remains with them. The Early Career Voice blog is not intended to provide medical advice or treatment. Only your healthcare provider can provide that. The American Heart Association recommends that you consult your healthcare provider regarding your personal health matters. If you think you are having a heart attack, stroke or another emergency, please call 911 immediately.”

 

 

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ECPR: What is it? And what do we know in 2020?

Despite advances in the resuscitation field, cardiac arrest, especially cardiac arrest in the setting of cardiogenic shock, continues to carry significant morbidity and mortality. This topic continues to challenge healthcare providers on ways to improve outcomes in patients with refractory cardiac arrest. Extra-Corporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) is a type of mechanical circulatory support device utilized for various conditions, including cardiogenic shock and multi-organ failure. I heard about ECPR recently, so I wanted to share what is out there, and potentially motivate colleagues and professionals to share their thoughts on this important topic.

What is ECPR?

ECPR (Extra-corporeal Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation) is the implementation of ECMO in selected patients with cardiac arrest, and may be considered when conventional CPR efforts fail in a setting with expeditious implementation and support.by skilled providers When/where does ECMO cannulation occur in these patients?

Patients with cardiac arrest and ongoing CPR are transported to the hospital while ongoing resuscitation efforts are being taken. ECMO potentially provides the circulatory and respiratory support these sick patients need until reversible conditions are addressed. ECMO cannulation usually occurs at the healthcare center, where skilled personnel and healthcare providers have expertise in ECMO. Figure 1 shows a simple illustration veno-arterial VA-ECMO utilized in ECPR.

Figure 1: Simple schematic illustration of veno-arterial VA-ECMO utilized in EPCR.

Figure 1: Simple schematic illustration of veno-arterial VA-ECMO utilized in EPCR.

What is the scientific evidence for the use of ECPR?

Unfortunately, there are no randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the use of ECPR in cardiac arrest patients at this time. The evidence supporting ECPR comes from observational studies in the past two decades, in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, and studies looking at ECPR in in-hospital cardiac arrest. Many, but not all, of the observational studies showed overall favorable neurological outcomes in those who receive ECPR compared to conventional CPR. It is important to note, however, that these studies had variable inclusion criteria, and potential risk for confounding bias, making their validity and generalizability questionable.

Are there any AHA guidelines supporting the use of ECPR?

AHA 2019 Guidelines Updates:

Recommendations—Updated 2019

  • There is insufficient evidence to recommend the routine use of ECPR for patients with cardiac arrest.
  • ECPR may be considered for selected patients as rescue therapy when conventional CPR efforts are failing in settings in which it can be expeditiously implemented and supported by skilled providers (Class 2b; Level of Evidence C-LD).

Why is this important?

Some studies in the past 2 decades have shown that ECPR might be associated with favorable neurological outcomes compared to conventional CPR. It is known that neurological outcomes in cardiac arrest patients have a significant effect on morbidity and mortality. As such, although these are observational studies with limited evidence, they shed light on a potential therapy that could lead to better outcomes in this very sick population. Future studies, including RCTs, are much needed to assess the outcomes of ECPR and identify patients who would benefit the most from this potential therapy.

I would like to say special thank you to my friend and colleague, Dr Khaldia Khaled, for her help on this blog.

Reference

Panchal et al: 2019 American Heart Association Focused Update on Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support: Use of Advanced Airways, Vasopressors, and Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation During Cardiac Arrest: An Update to the American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care. Circulation. 2019;140:e881–e894. DOI: 10.1161/CIR.0000000000000732.

The views, opinions and positions expressed within this blog are those of the author(s) alone and do not represent those of the American Heart Association. The accuracy, completeness and validity of any statements made within this article are not guaranteed. We accept no liability for any errors, omissions or representations. The copyright of this content belongs to the author and any liability with regards to infringement of intellectual property rights remains with them. The Early Career Voice blog is not intended to provide medical advice or treatment. Only your healthcare provider can provide that. The American Heart Association recommends that you consult your healthcare provider regarding your personal health matters. If you think you are having a heart attack, stroke or another emergency, please call 911 immediately.

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It’s Finally Here: New AHA Statement On Resuscitation In Pediatric Patients With Heart Disease And Comments From The Author

Do you want to read something amazing, awesome, and interesting? The AHA recently published its latest Scientific Statement: Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Infants and Children With Cardiac Disease

Cardiac arrest in the hospital is 10 times more common among children with congenital heart defects or other acquired heart conditions compared to children with healthy hearts, according to the statement published Monday in the journal Circulation.  As a pediatric cardiac intensivist, I often find myself overthinking things when I go for my PALS or ACLS recertification.  “Well, if the patient is having a pulmonary hypertensive crisis, then I’d actually do this also…” or “At this point, I would have already activated ECMO.” In all honesty, I don’t reach for my PALS card during a real-life resuscitation in the pediatric cardiac ICU anymore.  Not because I don’t follow the guidelines – I am the first to admit that high-quality CPR is the cornerstone of resuscitation and my team has these algorithms streamlined and burned into the backs of our minds – but because I have so many other things going through my head for this patient population.  (Does this baby have pacing wires? What vessels are patent? Is the shunt occluded? How will vasopressin affect this kid’s physiology? Has this chest tube been draining appropriately leading up to the arrest?)  None of these things are specifically addressed in the AHA resuscitation guidelines, until now. 

Bradley S. Marino, MD, MPP, MSCE, Professor of Pediatrics and Medical Social Sciences at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and a Pediatric Cardiac Intensivist at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital and Chair of the AHA Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young along with his expert colleagues on the AHA Congenital Cardiac Defects Committee have painstakingly taken the time to address the unique issues surrounding peri-resuscitation care and considerations for the high-risk pediatric cardiac population.  “The new statement is meant to be a powerful tool for health care professionals to both improve survival in children with heart disease who have a cardiac arrest and prevent cardiac arrests from ever happening in these high-risk children,” said Dr. Marino.  “This scientific statement is a critical supplement to the American Heart Association’s Pediatric Advanced Life Support Guidelines that has been long overdue,” Marino said.

I asked Dr. Marino what the most important thing was that the authors learned while putting together the statement. “Given the incidence of cardiac arrest in the pediatric cardiac population, activities to prevent cardiac arrest are very important.  We need to do more to modify our present clinical care systems to minimize the incidence of cardiac arrest.  In addition, we need to tailor our resuscitation strategies for children with cardiac disease. While the PALS recommendations are very helpful to resuscitate all children with cardiac arrest, more information was needed to address the special needs of the pediatric cardiac population.”

The statement reviews all of the stages of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (pre-arrest, during CPR, and post-resuscitation care) and the considerations for each stage of single-ventricle palliation, right- and left-sided heart disease, pulmonary hypertension, cardiomyopathies and myocarditis, and arrhythmias.  They also speak to considerations related to patient age, patient location, ECPR, and all of the various pharmacologic agents that we use frequently in these patients. 

As for Dr. Marino’s hopes for providers to take away after reading the statement, he says “Tailoring resuscitation is possible once providers understand the specific anatomy, physiology, and cardiopulmonary interaction that is present at each patient’s bedside.”

It’s definitely a long document to read through, but is a critical review for all providers who care for pediatric patients with heart disease, especially those of us in the ICU setting.  Click here to read it.

David Werho Headshot

David K. Werho, MD is an Assistant Clinical Professor at the University of California San Diego and a Pediatric Cardiac Intensivist at Rady Children’s Hospital – San Diego.  His research focuses on pediatric cardiac ICU outcomes as well as interventions and curriculum development in medical education.  He tweets @DWerho and contributes to the Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Society Newsletter as editor and contributor.

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Paradigm Shifts In Resuscitation

We go through a series of paradigm shifts during our childhood and development: the moments that change our outlook on the world around us and how we influence it.

  • “There’s a whole world outside of my home!”
  • “People can be really cruel!”
  • “Sharing is caring.”
  • “Chicken pox are contagious!”

Similar shifts occur in our development as physicians. I remember very distinctly the moment that the pathophysiology of heart failure finally just “clicked” in my mind.

A similar shift occurred as I reviewed a recent AHA news brief on survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Unconsciously, I had developed a thought-process around out-of-hospital cardiac arrest that was very skewed.

  • As a child, I thought of CPR as some sort of strange voodoo magic that only lifeguards and doctors could perform. It always worked and brought people back to life immediately with nothing but a residual cough (as they spit out water and seaweed, usually).
  • Then, as I trained to become a BLS instructor during medical school, I realized that anyone could do CPR, but it didn’t always work. There was no magic about it – it was pure science.
  • Through my years in medical school, residency, cardiology fellowship, and critical care fellowship, I saw patients who never recovered, or who had profoundly poor outcomes despite survival and I began to think of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest as sort of hopeless. Of course, there was the occasional patient who walked out of the ICU, but I felt like most of the time, if CPR was done outside the hospital, it was not going to end well.

However, after reading about the profound increase in survival and improved functional outcomes after bystanders used AEDs for patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, I suddenly have much more hope. I look back on my own experiences and realize that those patients who did well were the ones who had immediate bystander CPR /- the AED, depending on the etiology of arrest. I think my learned pessimism made it more difficult for me to recognize this connection. But, studies like this show that the evolution in resuscitation science, public health and safety culture, and education can make huge differences in our world. It makes me more hopeful for the future and more thoughtful about ways that I can influence the health and safety of those around me. I think I’m more hopeful now that even small efforts towards improved public health, not just around resuscitation, but anything that makes a positive impact, are worthwhile.

David Werho Headshot

David K. Werho, MD is an Assistant Clinical Professor at the University of California San Diego and a Pediatric Cardiac Intensivist at Rady Children’s Hospital – San Diego.  His research focuses on pediatric cardiac ICU outcomes as well as interventions and curriculum development in medical education.  He tweets @DWerho and contributes to the Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Society Newsletter as editor and contributor.