hidden

Follow Your Dreams: An Inspiring Journey Of an Electrophysiologist Turned Motivational Speaker and Life Coach

 

I am excited to interview Dr. Deborah Lockwood who is an electrophysiologist but recently her life took a very interesting turn and she decided to follow her passion outside medicine. She is sharing her incredible life journey with us in this video blog.

 

“The views, opinions and positions expressed within this blog are those of the author(s) alone and do not represent those of the American Heart Association. The accuracy, completeness and validity of any statements made within this article are not guaranteed. We accept no liability for any errors, omissions or representations. The copyright of this content belongs to the author and any liability with regards to infringement of intellectual property rights remains with them. The Early Career Voice blog is not intended to provide medical advice or treatment. Only your healthcare provider can provide that. The American Heart Association recommends that you consult your healthcare provider regarding your personal health matters. If you think you are having a heart attack, stroke or another emergency, please call 911 immediately.”

hidden

International Clinical Trials Day: A conversation with Prof Martin Landray

International Clinical Trials Day (ICTD) is commemorated worldwide on the 20th of May, in recognition of day on which James Lind started, what is widely believed to be the first randomized clinical trial, in 1747.1,2 In search of a treatment for Scurvy, he recruited 12 subjects aboard the HMS Salisbury of the British Royal Navy fleet for his “fair test”, assigning two men to each of six different daily treatments for a period of fourteen days.2

First launched in 2005, ICTD is also an opportunity to celebrate the achievements of clinical trialists and vitally, raise awareness of clinical trials and the need for randomized evidence.1 There has never been a greater need for randomized evidence than right now. In view of this, I’m delighted to have spoken with Professor Martin Landray, co-chief investigator of the RECOVERY trial, Professor of Medicine & Epidemiology at the Nuffield Department of Population Health, and Deputy Director at the Big Data Institute, University of Oxford, UK. We spoke about the incredibly successful RECOVERY trial,3 adaptive platform trials and the Good Clinical Trials Collaborative.4

I’m very grateful to Prof Landray for his time and insights, and I hope you learn from this hugely educational vlog as much as I did.

References

  1. International Clinical Trials Day (ICTD) [Internet]. ECRIN – European Clinical Research Infrastructure Network. Available from: https://ecrin.org/international-clinical-trials-day-ictd
  2. Milne I. Who was James Lind, and what exactly did he achieve? [Internet]. The James Lind Library, 2015. Available from: https://www.jameslindlibrary.org/articles/who-was-james-lind-and-what-exactly-did-he-achieve/
  3. Randomised Evaluation of COVID_19 Therapy (RECOVERY) Trial [Internet]. Randomised Evaluation of COVID_19 Therapy (RECOVERY) Trial. Available from; https://www.recoverytrial.net/
  4. Good Clinical Trials Collaborative [Internet]. Good Clinical Trials Collaborative. Available from:  https://wellcome.org/what-we-do/our-work/good-clinical-trials-collaborative

“The views, opinions and positions expressed within this blog are those of the author(s) alone and do not represent those of the American Heart Association. The accuracy, completeness and validity of any statements made within this article are not guaranteed. We accept no liability for any errors, omissions or representations. The copyright of this content belongs to the author and any liability with regards to infringement of intellectual property rights remains with them. The Early Career Voice blog is not intended to provide medical advice or treatment. Only your healthcare provider can provide that. The American Heart Association recommends that you consult your healthcare provider regarding your personal health matters. If you think you are having a heart attack, stroke or another emergency, please call 911 immediately.”

hidden

Vlog: What is one piece of advice you wish you previously knew or you think other early career investigators should know?

I am delighted to share my latest vlog where I ask researchers at various different stages of career development (from undergraduates to faculty members) to share one piece of advice they would give other trainees.

Thanks so much to everyone who agreed to participate in the video!

Check out the advice from the following researchers at the University of Minnesota’s Lillehei Heart Institute:

  • Megan Eklund, Researcher, Lab of Dr. Kurt Prins
  • Thijs Larson, Undergraduate Researcher, Lab of Drs. Daniel and Mary Garry
  • Javier Sierra-Pagan, Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP) student, Lab of Dr. Daniel Garry
  • Lynn Hartweck, Research Associate, Lab of Dr. Kurt Prins
  • Satyabrata Das, Assistant Professor
  • Kurt Prins, Assistant Professor

Special thanks to my husband, Tony Prisco, who helped put the video together!

Hope you enjoy this vlog and thanks for checking it out!

 

“The views, opinions and positions expressed within this blog are those of the author(s) alone and do not represent those of the American Heart Association. The accuracy, completeness and validity of any statements made within this article are not guaranteed. We accept no liability for any errors, omissions or representations. The copyright of this content belongs to the author and any liability with regards to infringement of intellectual property rights remains with them. The Early Career Voice blog is not intended to provide medical advice or treatment. Only your healthcare provider can provide that. The American Heart Association recommends that you consult your healthcare provider regarding your personal health matters. If you think you are having a heart attack, stroke or another emergency, please call 911 immediately.”

hidden

Advice on Looking for Academic Cardiology Positions: The First Ever AHA Early Career Voice Vlog

I am happy to present the first-ever AHA Early Career Voice Vlog! I am pleased to be able to have Drs. Rajat Kalra, Forum Kamdar, and Kurt Prins, all early faculty in academic cardiology, discuss their experience looking for and obtaining academic cardiology positions. Drs. Kalra, Kamdar, and Prins have been my mentors and role models throughout my residency and fellowship training and I am so glad they were willing to share their experiences and advice with us! They discussed various topics from how they looked for academic cardiology positions to how they negotiated their contracts.

Speakers:

Dr. Rajat Kalra is a clinician-scientist in the Imaging Section of the University of Minnesota’s Cardiovascular Division. His academic interests pertain to the use of clinical, laboratory, and imaging biomarkers to define the mechanisms underlying heart failure and cardiac arrest and refine prognostication in these conditions, Dr. Kalra’s clinical interests encompass the breadth of general cardiology and cardiac imaging.

Dr. Forum Kamdar is an advanced heart failure and transplant cardiologist and a Doris Duke-funded physician-scientist. She has a strong clinical and research interest in advanced heart failure associated with neuromuscular disorders. Her lab developed patient cell-based models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy to further elucidate mechanisms and she co-founded the Neuromuscular Cardiomyopathy Clinic.

Dr. Kurt Prins is an NIH-funded physician-scientist who performs translational research to understand mechanisms of right ventricular dysfunction in pulmonary hypertension. He also sees pulmonary hypertension patients.

“The views, opinions and positions expressed within this blog are those of the author(s) alone and do not represent those of the American Heart Association. The accuracy, completeness and validity of any statements made within this article are not guaranteed. We accept no liability for any errors, omissions or representations. The copyright of this content belongs to the author and any liability with regards to infringement of intellectual property rights remains with them. The Early Career Voice blog is not intended to provide medical advice or treatment. Only your healthcare provider can provide that. The American Heart Association recommends that you consult your healthcare provider regarding your personal health matters. If you think you are having a heart attack, stroke or another emergency, please call 911 immediately.”